Category Archives: Alternative Energy

Master Food Preservers 3 Day Workshop Cornell Cooperative Extension Sullivan County

farmersMkt

REGISTER  TODAY!

MASTER FOOD PRESERVER CLASSES

JULY 22-24 2014

ALL DAY SESSIONS INCLUDE  LUNCH AND SNACKS

LEARN HOW TO HARVEST AND  SAFELY PROCESS SUMMER’S ABUNDANCE BY LEARNING THE ART OF FOOD PRESERVATION  AT THIS 3-DAY HANDS-ON WORKSHOP TAUGHT AT CORNELL COOPERATIVE EXTENSION OF SULLIVAN COUNTY.

CORNELL UNIVERSITY INSTRUCTORS JUDY PRICE AND KATHERINE HUMPHREY WILL TAKE THE CLASS THROUGH EACH STEP OF CANNING, BOTH WATER BATH AND PRESSURE, FREEZING AND DEHYDRATION. BESIDES TRADITIONAL JAMS AND JELLIES, PICKLES AND RELISHES THE GROUP WILL BE TAUGHT WAYS TO PRESERVE MEAT AND FISH WITHOUT REFRIGERATION OR FREEZING, WHICH SAVES ENERGY AND INSURES A FOOD SUPPLY WHEN THE POWER GOES OFF!

DEHYDRATION OF FRUITS, VEGETABLES AND MAKING FRUIT LEATHER FOR HEALTHY SNACKS WILL BE DEMONSTRATED.

THIS IS A MUST TAKE SERIES FOR FARMERS,  HOMESTEADERS AND ANYONE INTERESTED IN CREATING A FOOD PANTRY OF LOCAL FOOD FOR THEIR FAMILY OR TO SHARE WITH OTHERS.

THE COURSE IS $375. FOR THE 3 DAYS AND COVERS ALL COURSE MATERIAL WHICH IS HELD IN A LOOSELEAF BINDER.

A CERTIFICATE OF MASTER FOOD PRESERVER IS AWARDED AFTER THE PARTICIPATES DEMONSTRATE A THOROUGH KNOWLEDGE OF SAFE FOOD PRESERVATION

CLASSES WILL BE HELD AT THE   GERALD SKODA EDUCATION CENTER , CORNELL COOPERATIVE EXTENSION SULLIVAN COUNTY, 64 FERNDALE LOOMIS ROAD, LIBERTY, NY 12754

CALL 845 292-6180 FOR MORE INFORMATION AND TO REGISTER

THIS CLASS IS FILLING UP FAST DO NOT WAIT TO REGISTER!

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Filed under Alternative Energy, EDUCATION, Uncategorized

Hancock Permaculture Courses Lucky Dog Organic Farm

flooded field in GoshenPURE CATSKILLS

LEARN HOW THIS ORGANIC FARMER AND NEW YORK CITY PROTECT THE WATERS THAT SERVES OVER 8 MILLION PEOPLE BY CAREFUL CONSERVATION OF THE LAND AND FORESTS THAT FORM THE WATERSHED.  YOU WILL APPRECIATE HOW THIS NOFA-NY CERTIFIED ORGANIC FARM SURVIVED THE DEVASTATING  EFFECTS OF 100 YEAR STORMS WHICH OCCUR WITH MORE FREQUENCY AS WE ADDRESS THE ISSUES OF CLIMATE CHANGE IN THIS HANDS-ON PERMACULTURE DESIGN COURSE.

 

Hancock Permaculture Design Course

Spring 2014 – begins June.

CONTACT: Andrew Leslie Phillips

Greenman124@yahoo.com

917-771-9382

Hancock Permaculture Center

HAMDEN, NEW YORK: To be held at Lucky Dog Farm, Hamden N.Y. With additional field visits to local regional farms and homesteads and the New York City Watershed.

 Five weekends over five months – June thru October – miss one, make it up later. Graduates receive the official permaculture design certificate which enables you to teach permaculture.

Lucky Dog Farm is a working organic farm, catering business, farm store, food hub, three hours from NYC in the picturesque northern Catcalls. Accommodation available at Lucky Dog’s Hamden Inn. Camping also available. Contact: hollyway@gmail.com

Special guest lecturers:

Wes Gillingham, Project Director, Catskills Mountain Keeper, the north-east’s leading antifracking organization.

Laurie Schoeman, founder Intervention Green addresses climate change and city planning.Laurie works on climate change and sustainability issues with government agencies in NYC.

LEAD INSTRUCTORS:

Andrew Leslie Phillips

: Hancock Permaculture Center;. Studied with Geoff Lawton and Bill

Mollison and known for his approachable teaching style.

Maria Grimaldi:

Degree in Environmental Psychology and diversified background teaching

gardening, farming, plant science, cooking with New York Botanical Gardens, Brooklyn Botanic

Garden, Cornell Cooperative Extension, NOFA-NY and Sullivan County Community College

.

ASSISTANT INSTRUCTORS:

Kyle T. Murray

: Catskill Mountain native brings youthful energy to this group. Studied with Andrew

Leslie Phillips, Hancock Permaculture Center, Albert Bates and Christopher Nesbitt at Maya

Mountain Research Farm, Belize. Alumni Paul Smiths College of the Adirondacks. Skills and

project experience include Land Surveying and Forestry, Arboriculture, Watershed Management,

and Natural Building

Erika Medina:

Certified Master Gardener and Naturalist. She lives in an off-grid homestead where

she runs a small CSA, raises bees, chickens, heritage ducks and turkeys. She and her husband

own and operate

One Earth Energy, a renewable energy design and installation company,

Dr Nancy Eos:

Family & holistic medical doctor, attorney. Studied with Dave Jacke (i2008).

Graduate of first Financial Permaculture course, Hohenwald, TN. Active with Transition Towns

Sullivan and Transition Towns Delaware – localized credit cards, stock exchanges, time dollar

enterprises, business funding, Think Local First campaigns.

WHEN

: Five modules over five months – first weekends May thru September.

WHERE

: Hamden N.Y., northern Catskills. Three hours from NYC. DIRECTIONS

COST

: $220 per weekend with five organic meals.

DEPOSIT

: $440 covers two sessions and ensures a place in this course.

Send check and register:

Hancock Permaculture Center

372 West Front Street Hancock NY 13783

Greenman124@yahoo.com

917-771-9382

More course details at:

http://www.hancockpermaculture.org/

“Care of Earth. Care of people. Return of surplus to both.”

 

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Filed under Alternative Energy, EDUCATION, Environment

Pro-Junk Anti-Frack! Shannon Hayes’ Radical Homemakers Take on Local Anti-Fracking Laws

SHANNON HAYES’ BLOG ON LOCAL ANTI-FRACKING LAWS IS TOO GOOD NOT TO PASS ON!

“The democratic process is pretty sleepy in my town. Monthly council meetings are conducted by a group of dedicated citizens who talk about unglamorous issues such as road repair, dog warden reports and budget matters. Meetings begin at 7:30pm with relatively few attendees, as many of the citizens tied to the local farming economy are either still outside working, or getting ready to fall into bed. But if you want to wake a sleeping bear, suggest making the local junkyard law more restrictive.

Then you’ll see some angry constituents.
That happened a few months ago, when some members of the community who preferred mowed grass and plastic whirly gigs to scrap metal and recycled lumber piles tried to bring forward a discussion about making our town look a little more “picked up.” That was a decidedly unpopular idea, and neighbors filled our town hall beyond capacity to drive their point home. My family was among them.

We are also among the group of neighbors who have begun a dialogue with council members discussing the need for an anti-fracking law. While the threat may not be as imminent as it is for those folks in the Southern Tier of our state, we feel that proactive measures taken now will protect us as fracking technology changes and the industry expands into our region. A few of our council members remain dubious that such a law would be wanted by our citizenry. How could folks who are pro-junk also be anti-frack? It’s all about self-reliance.

A lot of us keep “treasure” in our yards that someone from a high-end suburb might see as “trash.” But someone from a high-end suburb can collect a six figure salary several times over, pay an urban mechanic to maintain a new car, pay the electric bill to run the dryer for their clothes, pay the clerk at Whole Foods for their “farm fresh eggs,” pay someone else to come in with the necessary tools to maintain their lawns and homes.

But here in the town of Fulton, we depend on our own hands for many of these things. The “junk” in our yards is a resource base from which we can fix our cars, repair our houses, jury-rig a chicken coop, find a spare part to fix a mower, salvage some glass to hob together a cold frame for vegetables. The “junk” represents the tools we need to get by without a lot of income.

Whether it is a junkyard law or an anti-fracking law, the impetus remains the same: We desire legislation that protects our right and need to be self-reliant. Hyrdo-fracking purports to offer some quick cash for a few landholders, but everyone else runs the risk of losing their self-reliance when drinking wells either dry up or the water becomes too polluted to drink. If we no longer have potable water to raise our vegetables, can our tomatoes, make jelly from the wild brambles, or care for our livestock, we’ve lost our ability to take care of ourselves and thrown our well-being at the mercy of government, charity, and the companies who are now in business to haul water to communities that are confronting the fall-out of hydro-fracking.

None of us wants to wind up there. We want our junkyards. We want our anti-fracking laws, too. To live well around here, most of us need to be somewhat self-reliant. Money doesn’t grow on trees around these parts, but fruit does. And vegetables grow in the ground, livestock grow in the pastures, and firewood grows on the hills. If we have clean water to sustain all of it, we’ll have enough food in our bellies, wood in our fires and junk in our backyards to have a great life, regardless of how much money is in our pockets.”

 

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Filed under Alternative Energy, Gas Drilling Hydro-Fracking, Sustainable Farming, Transition Towns

PASA Asserts Position on Unconventional Gas Extraction Hydro-Fracking

June 12, 2012
Pennsylvania Association for Sustainable Agriculture Urges a Moratorium on Unconventional Gas Drilling
June 11, 2012

PENNSYLVANIA ASSOCIATION FOR SUSTAINABLE AGRICULTURE
Promoting Profitable Farms that Produce Healthy Food for All
People while Respecting the Natural Environment
Statement on Unconventional Natural Gas Extraction
Adopted: June 11, 2012

PASA asserts its position in favor of a moratorium on unconventional gas extraction, until it is determined that this practice will not impair the ability of farms to profitably produce healthy food while respecting Pennsylvania’s air quality, water resources and the natural environment.

PASA supports:

  • Assuring the highest quality of life for the farming community and the environment in all aspects of natural gas extraction through unbiased, third party studies of the long-term impacts. These studies must assess the impacts on the environment and public health, including an in-depth look at the integrity, health and long term sustainability of our food supply.
  • Establishing baselines, parameters, and comprehensive third party testing of water resources, soil health, air quality and human and animal welfare prior to and after extraction procedures.
  • Requiring drilling companies to post a bond which is held in escrow in their name, payable with interest in the event that there are no negative environmental consequences 5 years after capping the well, to be determined by a certified third party engineer.
  • Developing and moving towards a comprehensive sustainable and renewable energy plan that encourages conservation of our natural resources.
  • Enabling the farming community’s input in decision making regarding the location of natural gas facilities and related pipelines.
  • Requiring fairness and transparency in all stages of exploration, leasing, drilling and production, and recognition and respect of landowners’ rights, including those who do not own subsurface rights. Full disclosure creates trust between landowners, energy companies and land aggregators, and needs to be addressed before additional wells are drilled.
  • Full accountability and fairness in remediation for any negative environmental and/or economic loss to farmers.

PASA recognizes its mission extends far beyond the edge of field and pasture. This work encompasses the development of and education around healthy food systems for both urban and rural communities. Unconventional gas drilling affects local farmers and farms, the food they produce, and the consumers who eat it.

We therefore urge the Governor and Legislature of the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania to use this moratorium to ensure that the above issues have been addressed and resolved, and to re-evaluate the safety of methods used in natural gas extraction and its potential threat to our watersheds, food safety and the quality of life of farmers.

PASA continues to provide educational programming to support sustainable agriculture practices resulting in economically viable farms. We are committed to maintaining an organization that protects food systems by focusing on our mission of promoting profitable farms that produce healthy food for all people while respecting the natural environment.

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Filed under Alternative Energy, Environment, Gas Drilling Hydro-Fracking, Sustainable Farming

Permaculture Cottage ~ Beyond Consumerism…Life after Debt.

I found this link to a Permaculture website in Ireland. Halfway around the world, a different culture? Yet so much like our Catskill Hudson Region.

Check it out!

Permaculture Cottage ~ Beyond Consumerism…Life after Debt..

 

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Filed under Alternative Energy, Environment, Gas Drilling Hydro-Fracking, Sustainable Farming, Transition Towns