Tag Archives: global warming

Hancock Permaculture Courses Lucky Dog Organic Farm

flooded field in GoshenPURE CATSKILLS

LEARN HOW THIS ORGANIC FARMER AND NEW YORK CITY PROTECT THE WATERS THAT SERVES OVER 8 MILLION PEOPLE BY CAREFUL CONSERVATION OF THE LAND AND FORESTS THAT FORM THE WATERSHED.  YOU WILL APPRECIATE HOW THIS NOFA-NY CERTIFIED ORGANIC FARM SURVIVED THE DEVASTATING  EFFECTS OF 100 YEAR STORMS WHICH OCCUR WITH MORE FREQUENCY AS WE ADDRESS THE ISSUES OF CLIMATE CHANGE IN THIS HANDS-ON PERMACULTURE DESIGN COURSE.

 

Hancock Permaculture Design Course

Spring 2014 – begins June.

CONTACT: Andrew Leslie Phillips

Greenman124@yahoo.com

917-771-9382

Hancock Permaculture Center

HAMDEN, NEW YORK: To be held at Lucky Dog Farm, Hamden N.Y. With additional field visits to local regional farms and homesteads and the New York City Watershed.

 Five weekends over five months – June thru October – miss one, make it up later. Graduates receive the official permaculture design certificate which enables you to teach permaculture.

Lucky Dog Farm is a working organic farm, catering business, farm store, food hub, three hours from NYC in the picturesque northern Catcalls. Accommodation available at Lucky Dog’s Hamden Inn. Camping also available. Contact: hollyway@gmail.com

Special guest lecturers:

Wes Gillingham, Project Director, Catskills Mountain Keeper, the north-east’s leading antifracking organization.

Laurie Schoeman, founder Intervention Green addresses climate change and city planning.Laurie works on climate change and sustainability issues with government agencies in NYC.

LEAD INSTRUCTORS:

Andrew Leslie Phillips

: Hancock Permaculture Center;. Studied with Geoff Lawton and Bill

Mollison and known for his approachable teaching style.

Maria Grimaldi:

Degree in Environmental Psychology and diversified background teaching

gardening, farming, plant science, cooking with New York Botanical Gardens, Brooklyn Botanic

Garden, Cornell Cooperative Extension, NOFA-NY and Sullivan County Community College

.

ASSISTANT INSTRUCTORS:

Kyle T. Murray

: Catskill Mountain native brings youthful energy to this group. Studied with Andrew

Leslie Phillips, Hancock Permaculture Center, Albert Bates and Christopher Nesbitt at Maya

Mountain Research Farm, Belize. Alumni Paul Smiths College of the Adirondacks. Skills and

project experience include Land Surveying and Forestry, Arboriculture, Watershed Management,

and Natural Building

Erika Medina:

Certified Master Gardener and Naturalist. She lives in an off-grid homestead where

she runs a small CSA, raises bees, chickens, heritage ducks and turkeys. She and her husband

own and operate

One Earth Energy, a renewable energy design and installation company,

Dr Nancy Eos:

Family & holistic medical doctor, attorney. Studied with Dave Jacke (i2008).

Graduate of first Financial Permaculture course, Hohenwald, TN. Active with Transition Towns

Sullivan and Transition Towns Delaware – localized credit cards, stock exchanges, time dollar

enterprises, business funding, Think Local First campaigns.

WHEN

: Five modules over five months – first weekends May thru September.

WHERE

: Hamden N.Y., northern Catskills. Three hours from NYC. DIRECTIONS

COST

: $220 per weekend with five organic meals.

DEPOSIT

: $440 covers two sessions and ensures a place in this course.

Send check and register:

Hancock Permaculture Center

372 West Front Street Hancock NY 13783

Greenman124@yahoo.com

917-771-9382

More course details at:

http://www.hancockpermaculture.org/

“Care of Earth. Care of people. Return of surplus to both.”

 

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Filed under Alternative Energy, EDUCATION, Environment

AFTER THE FLOOD— OCTOBER PROMISES A RAINBOW ON OUR FARMLANDS

There were cloud bursts and heavy rains AGAIN all last week and threats of flash flooding of the the many creeks and rivers here….but there were also periods of sun that broke through the storm clouds. Coming home at sunset the other day as I drove past my neighbor’s field I became awestruck by the double,  enormous rainbow that dominated the landscape. I stopped the car and contemplated the message from nature of better times ahead for our New York farmers. Our October calendar  will be filled with celebrations of our harvest as well as plans for a brighter future for New York farmers.

It reminded me of this passage from the Old Testament

From Genesis 9

And God said, “This is the sign of the covenant I am making between me and you and every living creature with you, a covenant for all generations to come: 13 I have set my rainbow in the clouds, and it will be the sign of the covenant between me and the earth. 14 Whenever I bring clouds over the earth and the rainbow appears in the clouds, 15 I will remember my covenant between me and you and all living creatures of every kind. Never again will the waters become a flood to destroy all life. 16 Whenever the rainbow appears in the clouds, I will see it and remember the everlasting covenant between God and all living creatures of every kind on the earth.”

The dictionary defines a “covenant” as an agreement.  Perhaps if we take better care of the earth and pay attention to our human impact on climate change and our soil and water resources….. the “rainbow” can fulfill its promise?

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Filed under Sustainable Farming, Uncategorized

SURVIVING AGRICULTURAL DESTRUCTION Forbes Magazine Todd Essig

I was struck by reading this article in Forbes Magazine by Todd Essig entitled Surviving Hurricane’s Irene Agricultural Disaster  just how important the connection between climate change and food supply is as an ongoing Locavore Challenge.  This is an excerpt from Essig’s  finally tuned article that relates to our Region.

Among those for whom Irene’s pain will continue are consumers with any sort
of relationship to local foods—from the committed locavore to farmers’ market
shoppers to those who nibble an occasional autumn apple. But the pain can be
lessened, and the benefits of local food preserved, by reconnecting the
food-weather link and developing more realistic expectations…………

Feeling an intimate bond between food and weather, a bond farmers live with
every day, is unfamiliar these days. Nationwide distributors buffer us from any
direct contact with the table-side consequences of weather, other than a few
pennies more or less on commodity prices. They do this by mixing food from
multiple regions into a single geographically diversified inventory thereby
managing risk from catastrophic weather in any one region. Unfortunately, they
also minimize reward, eliminating much of the taste, health benefits, and
advantages to the local communities in which the food was raised. In fact, much
of what we buy from these nationwide inventories should be called a “calorie
delivery system” rather than food.”

To read the entire article go to http://www.forbes.com/sites/toddessig/2011/08/30/surviving-hurricane-irenes-agricultural-destruction/

It is worth taking the time to do so.

Keep in mind Essig is a psychologist who writes for Psychology Today AND Forbes.

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Filed under Sustainable Farming

When Times Get Tough….The Tough Get Farming-Small Farms Continue to Increase

In spite of the continual negative media coverage on the “job” market, the largest growing sector of the economy seems to remain ignored. Food and farming continue to grow, both figuratively and literally.

According to USDA Census reports:  The sector with the largest growth in percentage and absolute terms was farms with less than 50 acres.

Moreover, more small farms in America means more locally produced food, which means less petroleum burned transporting food across the country or around the world. A Cornell University study notes that a “simple but radical reduction in transport distance” would save great amounts of energy; for example, “transporting strawberries from California to New York by air requires 100 kcal of oil per kcal of strawberry imported.”

Jobs are HERE, not only in actual “hands-on” farming, but in farm and food related businesses. It will be a long time before people stop eating.

Visit our  Regional links especially   http://nebeginningfarmers.org/farmers/  and stay tuned as to what is going on in our Region in this important sector of the local economy.

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Filed under Sustainable Farming