Tag Archives: Pure Catskills

Hancock Permaculture Courses Lucky Dog Organic Farm

flooded field in GoshenPURE CATSKILLS

LEARN HOW THIS ORGANIC FARMER AND NEW YORK CITY PROTECT THE WATERS THAT SERVES OVER 8 MILLION PEOPLE BY CAREFUL CONSERVATION OF THE LAND AND FORESTS THAT FORM THE WATERSHED.  YOU WILL APPRECIATE HOW THIS NOFA-NY CERTIFIED ORGANIC FARM SURVIVED THE DEVASTATING  EFFECTS OF 100 YEAR STORMS WHICH OCCUR WITH MORE FREQUENCY AS WE ADDRESS THE ISSUES OF CLIMATE CHANGE IN THIS HANDS-ON PERMACULTURE DESIGN COURSE.

 

Hancock Permaculture Design Course

Spring 2014 – begins June.

CONTACT: Andrew Leslie Phillips

Greenman124@yahoo.com

917-771-9382

Hancock Permaculture Center

HAMDEN, NEW YORK: To be held at Lucky Dog Farm, Hamden N.Y. With additional field visits to local regional farms and homesteads and the New York City Watershed.

 Five weekends over five months – June thru October – miss one, make it up later. Graduates receive the official permaculture design certificate which enables you to teach permaculture.

Lucky Dog Farm is a working organic farm, catering business, farm store, food hub, three hours from NYC in the picturesque northern Catcalls. Accommodation available at Lucky Dog’s Hamden Inn. Camping also available. Contact: hollyway@gmail.com

Special guest lecturers:

Wes Gillingham, Project Director, Catskills Mountain Keeper, the north-east’s leading antifracking organization.

Laurie Schoeman, founder Intervention Green addresses climate change and city planning.Laurie works on climate change and sustainability issues with government agencies in NYC.

LEAD INSTRUCTORS:

Andrew Leslie Phillips

: Hancock Permaculture Center;. Studied with Geoff Lawton and Bill

Mollison and known for his approachable teaching style.

Maria Grimaldi:

Degree in Environmental Psychology and diversified background teaching

gardening, farming, plant science, cooking with New York Botanical Gardens, Brooklyn Botanic

Garden, Cornell Cooperative Extension, NOFA-NY and Sullivan County Community College

.

ASSISTANT INSTRUCTORS:

Kyle T. Murray

: Catskill Mountain native brings youthful energy to this group. Studied with Andrew

Leslie Phillips, Hancock Permaculture Center, Albert Bates and Christopher Nesbitt at Maya

Mountain Research Farm, Belize. Alumni Paul Smiths College of the Adirondacks. Skills and

project experience include Land Surveying and Forestry, Arboriculture, Watershed Management,

and Natural Building

Erika Medina:

Certified Master Gardener and Naturalist. She lives in an off-grid homestead where

she runs a small CSA, raises bees, chickens, heritage ducks and turkeys. She and her husband

own and operate

One Earth Energy, a renewable energy design and installation company,

Dr Nancy Eos:

Family & holistic medical doctor, attorney. Studied with Dave Jacke (i2008).

Graduate of first Financial Permaculture course, Hohenwald, TN. Active with Transition Towns

Sullivan and Transition Towns Delaware – localized credit cards, stock exchanges, time dollar

enterprises, business funding, Think Local First campaigns.

WHEN

: Five modules over five months – first weekends May thru September.

WHERE

: Hamden N.Y., northern Catskills. Three hours from NYC. DIRECTIONS

COST

: $220 per weekend with five organic meals.

DEPOSIT

: $440 covers two sessions and ensures a place in this course.

Send check and register:

Hancock Permaculture Center

372 West Front Street Hancock NY 13783

Greenman124@yahoo.com

917-771-9382

More course details at:

http://www.hancockpermaculture.org/

“Care of Earth. Care of people. Return of surplus to both.”

 

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Filed under Alternative Energy, EDUCATION, Environment

A Special Thanksgiving 2012


Visioning From the River Reporter
November 22, 2012 —
This Thanksgiving, you may be staying home with your family to enjoy a traditional meal, or you may be traveling and choosing to join a celebration at a relative’s or friend’s house. Perhaps you choose to participate in a gathering sponsored by a soup kitchen or church. Some may have even preferred to go to a restaurant that offers a Thanksgiving buffet with all the trimmings. (The most attractive restaurants these days seem to be those that feature a menu inspired by local farms.) Regardless of where you spent Thanksgiving Day, we are reminded that our American Thanksgiving is centered on the notion of giving thanks for the earth’s bounty and the abundance of the harvest. This year, I give special thanks to our local farmers and the many enlightened community leaders and environmental groups who have worked hard all year to educate legislators, farmers, producers and consumers in caring about our soil, forest and water resources that are nature’s support of agriculture here.
Contrary to popular belief, the number of farmers in the United States is growing, and the Northeast is no exception. We have hundreds of beginning farmers in New York State alone, and that number continues to increase. Many start by helping to cultivate land as interns on existing farms or on their own land, which might be a backyard in a suburban setting. City rooftops are turning green and barges in the Hudson River are growing food in greenhouses.
I admire the existing dairy farmers and their families, in New York and Pennsylvania, who are developing strategies to remain profitable. They diversify their operations by raising grass-fed meats, developing on-farm processing facilities and marketing milk through direct sales. Many have become artisans adding value to their already excellent milk by producing exceptional cheeses, cultured dairy products and frozen desserts that rival the finest imported specialties and far surpass any that are mass produced and overly processed.
There are beginning farmer programs sponsored by USDA and administered through the cooperative extension offices and land-grant universities, as well as private non-profits such as the Northeast Organic Farming Association of New York (NOFA-NY), Pure Catskills and the Pennsylvania Association for Sustainable Agriculture ( PASA).
In 2012, we watched school gardens grow, tended by children, teachers and a corps of youth hired through the Center for Workforce Development. Farmers’ markets, farmstands, specialty stores, Community Supported Agriculture (CSA) shares of a farm’s bounty, as well as eating establishments promoting locally produced food, continue to take a large share of consumers’ food dollars, dollars that are immediately returned to the local economy. Beyond providing wholesome and consumable products, our farmers enrich our lives on a daily basis by creating jobs that generate economic activity.
When I moved to Youngsville over 30 years ago, I dreamed of living in an environment where I could live in harmony with my neighbors and the environment while growing much of my own food. Today, more than half of that dream is recognized. I can walk down my road and legally buy a bottle of raw milk from my neighbor, or go to the neighborhood markets and buy exquisite fresh mozzarella and aged cheeses produced at farms very close by. My chickens produce the finest eggs anywhere, as they forage on grass and insects in the yard. The organic garden continues to yield abundant fruits and vegetables.
This Thanksgiving, I am especially thankful for seeing so much accomplished here by our farming community. I look to the future and see a viable economic system of an affordable, local food distribution system that will serve everyone in our community, where no one is left behind, including the growing population of seniors, many who are shut in at home or in nursing facilities; school lunchrooms; and government institutions including prisons.
Today, I am thankful to be surrounded by people with the abilities and resources to produce so much abundance. My dream is that we can all participate in sharing our local harvest. We are getting there. Let’s continue to make this Thanksgiving and 2013 a step in that direction.


[Maria Grimaldi is the Catskill Regional Representative for the Northeast Organic Farming Association of New York (www.nofany.org) and an educator with Catskill Delaware Permaculture (www.catskilldelawarepermaculture.org).

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Filed under Beginning Farmer, EDUCATION, Environment, PERMACULUTURE

Friends Say Farewell to Challey Comer Pure Catskills

Challey Comer’s face has become even more familiar than the Pure Catskills logo that she represents in her role as leading the farm marketing initiative of the Watershed Agricultural Council in Walton, New York

On Monday May 21 about 100 of her friends and colleagues gathered at the Catskill Art Society in Livingston Manor to bid her a fond farewell as she leaves to do data collection and  research at Columbia University on the very subject she loves most, building an effective Regional Foodshed.

Everyone will miss Challey’s special energy and warmth that we know will make her very hard to replace at Pure Catskills.

Table ladened with locally sourced food—of course for Chally’s farewell party.

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