Tag Archives: sustainable farming

High Tunnel Field Day at Neversink Organic Farm August 3, 2015

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NEVERSINK ORGANIC FARM

Cornell Cooperative Extension of Sullivan County Greenhouse High Tunnel Tour

CLARYVILLE, NY— An educational tour of high tunnel and greenhouse agricultural production practices is offered on Monday, August 3, 2015. Cornell Cooperative Extension Sullivan County (CCESC) will offer this program from 3:00 to 5:00 pm at Neversink Farm on 635 Claryville Road in Claryville. Neversink Farm is Certified Organic by NOFA-NY Certified Organic LLC.

Topics on this tour will include on-farm production methods using season extension structures through observation of existing systems at Neversink Farm, accompanied by informative commentary. Educators will discuss the ways in which season extension makes it possible for some vegetables to be grown beyond their intended season and at more affordable rates. Participants will learn varying management techniques for different plants in each structure and how they are used in production circumstances.

Cost to attend is $15.00 per person or $10.00 per CCESC enrollee. Anyone can enroll in the CCESC association for an annual donation of $25.00 per household. Enrollees must identify membership status at time of payment in order to receive discounts.

Space is limited and pre-registration with non-refundable payment is required in advance. Seats are only guaranteed with payment. Registration and more information can be obtained by calling CCESC at 845-292-6180, emailing sullivan@cornell.edu, or visiting http://www.sullivancce.org. Payment can be made in advance by check, cash, or credit.

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Offered by: Michelle Lipari

845-292-6180, ext. 129

Agriculture & 4-H Community Educator

mml249@cornell.edu

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Filed under EDUCATION, Field Day Event, Sustainable Farming

Give A Gift Membership to NOFA-NY!

GIVE A GIFT MEMBERSHIP! Struggling to find the perfect gift? Maybe it’s for your friend who loves shopping at the farmers market. Or your neice who aspires to be a farmer. Or your colleague who’s passionate about organic food. They’re going to really appreciate your gift membership in NOFA-NY! A $30 Gift Membership includes: a one year subscription to New York Organic News, our 40 page magazine that includes feature articles and regular columns and departments a one year subscription to The Natural Farmer, our quarterly news journal that has a pull out section on a particular topic relevant to organic food and farming the Annual Local & Organic Food & Farm Guide, New York State’s most comprehensive listing of organic and sustainable farms When you purchase a gift membership, you will immediately receive an attractive certificate that lists the benefits of membership that you can e-mail to the recipient or print out on a printer to give to that person. To purchase your gift membership, simply click here. Also consider making a gift donation to NOFA-NY. Your gift donation will go directly to supporting our programs and services that promote local, organic food and farming. To make a donation, simply click here. You will recieve an acknowledgement letter of your gift membership, which is 100% tax-deductible. NOFA-NY is a statewide organization leading a growing movement of farmers, consumers, gardeners, and businesses committed to promoting local, organic food and farming. http://www.nofany.org

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Filed under Beginning Farmer, EDUCATION, Local Business

Call Your Senator Today!

NOFATHUMBNAIL

Demand Fix to Important Farm Programs

This fall, Congress made a mistake that prevents farmers from signing up for the Conservation Stewardship Program (CSP) this year, leaving over 9,000 farmers high and dry.
Today, the Senate will take up their own version of the bill to fund government programs through the rest of 2013. They have a chance to fix this mistake and restore funding for key sustainable agriculture programs. 
Don’t let Congress leave these programs stranded.  Speak out today!  Please call:Senator Gillibrand at (202) 224-4451

Senator Schumer at (202) 224-6542

 

An example message is:

“I’m calling about the Continuing Resolution.  Please tell the Senator to fix the Conservation Stewardship Program so USDA can hold a farmer sign-up this year.  Also tell the Senator to support mandatory funding in the bill for the programs that were stranded in the farm bill extension, including:

  • Beginning Farmer and Rancher Development Program
  • Organic Agriculture Research & Extension Initiative
  • National Organic Certification Cost Share Program

These programs are important to sustainable NYS farmers, and they must be funded.”
Just a few minutes of your time will make a real difference in the lives of sustainable NYS farmers.
Sincerely,
Kate
Kate Mendenhall Executive Director, NOFA-NY

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Filed under Beginning Farmer, EDUCATION, Environment, Local Business, Workforce Development

HUDSON VALLEY REGIONAL CONFERENCE WELCOMES NATIONAL FARM FIGURE

Farming Our Future will take place on Saturday, February 23rd at Taconic Hills Central School from 9:00 A.M. to 4:30 P.M. This conference, now in its second year, will bring together a diverse community and regional audience including established farmers, beginning farmers, interested non-farmers, suppliers, educators, community leaders, industry leaders and students.

 

Jim Slama, Founder and President of FamilyFarmed.org, will deliver the keynote address.  Good Food = Good Business will showcase Slama’s groundbreaking work to develop and implement regional food aggregation facilities that strengthen local food systems and empower family farmers to scale up, gain access to wholesale markets, and become more successful. FamilyFarmed.org‘s national farmer-training project, which has given over 2,500 farmers access to essential information about food safety and how to sell to wholesale buyers, will be a core element of his talk. 

 

How Food Moves is the topic of a panel discussion moderated by Todd Erling, Executive Director of Hudson Valley AgriBusiness Development Corporation, which will tackle some of the tough questions on how to get more locally grown food into the hands of chefs and consumers, and explore some of the new approaches that could make buying local a whole lot easier.

 

The panel Growing a Farm-Friendly Municipality will be moderated by Cornell University Cooperative Extension’s Steve Hadcock, with panelists from American Farmland Trust, Glynwood, and Ancram’s Ag Advisory Council, and will explore opportunities for developing the way your town or county approaches farming, planning, and economic development.  

 

Have land?  For young farmers, sometimes finding viable land to farm can be a challenge.  Landowners will hear, from Columbia Land Conservancy’s Marissa Codey, just what is involved in opening up a parcel for a young farmer in Leasing Land to Farmers: Challenges and Opportunities.

 

Those looking for a unique experience can attend

Farming Our Future – What Role Can You Play? Facilitated by Hawthorne Valley’s Farmscape Ecology Program’s Anna Duhon and Claudia Knab-Vispo, panelists and attendees will examine ways that history, ecology, and culture have intersected to create the environment we inhabit and will learn ways to optimize future interactions.

 

Help Me, Help You is a practical workshop with Farm Credit East’s Emili Ponte and The Carrot Project’s Benneth Phelps that will focus on tools farmers need to make their business attractive for financing and investors. 

 

The “World Café” portion of the program will provide opportunities for attendees to gather around topics of common interest, to share collaborative dialogue and knowledge, and to create possibilities for action. 

 

The children’s program is open to kids ages 5 -13 and is free thanks to a sponsorship by the FarmOn! Foundation. The program includes landscape painting with local artist Nancy Rutter, “Horses and Kids” with Copake’s Lilly Becker, and basketball with Celtics retired player Eric Williams. Space is extremely limited, and advanced registration is required before Thursday at 5 pm.  Register your child 

 

Farming Our Future 2013 is sponsored in part by Ginsberg’s Foods, Valley Energy, Berkshire Taconic Community Foundation, the FarmOn! Foundation, Hudson Solar, Hudson Mohawk Resource Conservation and Development Council, and The Columbia Paper.

 

Exhibitors and sponsorships are encouraged. Proceeds from the conference will go toward Taconic Hills’s award-winning H.A.R.V.E.S.T. Club (Healthy Agricultural Resources by Volunteers & Educators in Science & Technology), a program that engages youth in the process of growing healthy fruits, flowers and vegetables in a school-based garden, and the Parent Teacher Organization. 

 

The cost to attend is $20 per person for adults and $10 per person for students, with advance registration, and $25 per person at the door.   The full schedule along with registration information can be found online at www.farmingourfuture.org.

 

 

 

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Filed under Beginning Farmer, CONFERENCE, EDUCATION, Environment, Local Business, Local Farm Food Event

Rondout Valley Growers Association Farm to Community Series FOOD MATTERS

 

 

Food Matters!

A Series of Farm-to-Community Conversations

A Day in the Life of a Local Farmer

Friday, Febrary 24, 6:30-8:00pm, Accord Firehouse Find out from local farmers what it takes to work the land, grow crops and raise livestock that keep us happy and healthy. Chris Kelder of Kelder’s Farm, Deena Wade of Transition Marbletown and a group of local farmers will talk about the real-time world of farming right here in the Rondout Valley. Suggested donation: $5. The Accord Firehouse is at 22 Main Street (entry in rear).

Goodnight Irene: Lessons in Resilience

Friday, March 9, 6:30-8:00pm, Accord Firehouse Our region was walloped by Hurricanes Irene and Lee, and many of our local farms were hit hard. Find out from farmers how they have recovered and how we can help strengthen our local food resources for a secure future. Suggested donation: $5. The Accord Firehouse, 22 Main Street (entry in rear).

Food Landscape: Farmer, Food and Family

Friday, March 23, 6-7:30pm, Marbletown Elementary School Did you know that our valley has some of the best farmland in the United States and we are lucky to have a great variety of farmers? Come find out about the bounty outside your door. This evening is part of the “Breakfast for Dinner” event organized by the Marbletown Parent Teacher Friends and the Chefs Consortium. Join the fun with optional dinner prepared with local food, Zumba (r) workout for all ages, local food exhibits and farmers who will share with you how our local food is created. Kids are welcome! Suggested donation: $5. Dinner is $7 for adults, $4 for children, with reduced family pricing. Marbletown Elementary School is at 12 Pine Bush Road in Stone Ridge.

http://www.rondoutvalleygrowers.org/

 

This program of RVGA’s Rondout Valley Growers Education Project is fiscally sponsored by the Open Space Institute as part of their Citizen Action Program. Co-Sponsored by: Transition Marbletown, Town of Rochester Environmental Conservation Commission, Marbletown Parent Teacher Friends & Chefs Consortium.

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Filed under Environment, FARMERS MARKETS, Local Business, Local Farm Food Event, Locavore Challenge Event, Sustainable Farming, Transition Towns, Workforce Development

Growing Under Cover Neversink Farm Claryville New York–Beauty More Then Skin Deep!

 FLOATING ROW COVERS ADD ANOTHER ZONE INSIDE THE GREENHOUSE

Winter growing is a challenge for northeast farmers but a visit to NOFA-NY Certified Organic Farm in Claryville New York in mid-January demonstrates that it can be done and done well. Kate and Conor Crickmore are meticulous farmers and surprisingly Conor declared emphatically that aesthetics was a “very  important part of the operation.” Maybe it’s Conor’s background as a restaurant owner in New York City rather than his commitment to the USDA regulated  details of growing organic food that prompted this comment. But one would have to agree, that in spite of the long-term belief that organic food might not look as good as conventionally grown food, when it comes to marketing your product “aesthetics” does matter.

“It all ties in together anyhow” said Conor. Methods of harvesting, proper packaging, labeling, getting produce to market so that it is beautiful also reflects the care that goes into growing food “on a human scale”. Nothing at Neversink Farm is overreaching in scale or volume, yet Neversink offers diversity of products that the Crickmores are developing slowly and carefully paying strict attention to National Organic Practices (NOP).

Growing under-cover in hoop houses are an important part of Neversink’s year-round operation. In summer, it is cucumbers and tomatoes “They must have even heat” says Conor, “to develop a sweet juicy flavor.” And with his restaurant background, one can see that flavorful food is what it is all about, from his slower, growing meat chickens and  heritage breed layers  to the stunning Tansworth pigs that add to the farm’s diversity and manure source.

 Employing a “stacking of functions” the Neversink poultry flock prepares the ground in the high tunnel for early spring planting. In the warm weather the poultry are truly free ranging guarded against predators by two donkeys who are kept primarily for their contributions to soil fertility.

The winter crop consists of  mixed salad greens, including Mizuna and Tatzoi which are put into rotation with spinach and lettuce in the greenhouse beds.  The greens are delivered in “just picked” condition, washed, nicely  packaged (with a gold label) to specialty food stores  and restaurants in the area.

The greenhouse crop varies as the months progress into spring taking advantage of the natural course of the sun in fall and winter. Neversink CSA subscribers, retailers and farmers market customers were also treated in late fall to greenhouse grown carrots. Conor remarked that “no carrots or potatoes are left” so storage is not presently a problem. Everthing is kept to scale with appropriate yields for the season’s demands and marketing opportunities, remembering their motto “Human Scale Sustainable Agriculture.”

For more information and to appreciate the diversity of this outstanding organic farm please visit the Neversink Farm  website where you may find information on food events, farm tours and CSA subscription as well as more insight into the philosophy that inspires “beautiful” organic farming which goes much deeper than appearance.

http://www.neversinkfarm.com/

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Filed under Beginning Farmer, Environment, Sustainable Farming